Ramen alla Marinara Dashi Tonno

When I write about cooking, it’s mostly about oatmeal. Sometimes it’s about things you can put into oatmeal. And sometimes, not often, it’s about things you can put into things you put into oatmeal. This is one of those times.

I’ve written before about dashi, the seaweed/tuna broth that’s the basis for much Japanese cooking. I’ve even written about using it in oatmeal. This recipe is about using the leftovers.

As all followers of this blog know, the best way to make dashi at home is to soak one 2×2 slice of kombu seaweed, along with half a package of dried, shredded, katsuobushi tuna, in a quart of water overnight. In the morning, you heat it to the steaming point, remove the kombu, and let it cool. Then you strain out the katsuobushi, reserving it for other uses, and store the dashi in the fridge until the urge for miso cocktails strikes.

Well, one night I was just getting ready to heat the dashi mix for the next morning’s breakfast while wondering what I could do about dinner. MJ was off learning how to be a better judge of dogs, so I could experiment. There was a quarter jar of marinara sauce in the fridge that was going to go off soon. Suppose I mixed the katsuobushi tuna scrapings with the marinara sauce and put it on spaghetti? Suppose I mixed the katsuobushi tuna scrapings with the marinara sauce and put it on ramen? That would keep the Japanese influence strong, and I just happened to have half a case of ramen left from the last time I was in college.*

Setup: After leaving the dashi mix in the fridge overnight pour the entire works, broth, katsuobushi tuna, and kombu seaweed, into a two quart pot. Heat until steaming. Remove the kombu (don’t eat it, it’s like eating a wet suit ) and add a package of ramen. Ramen that is fresh-rolled by your obaa-san is best, but instant cup ramen is OK. Keep the mixture just below a simmer for five minutes. Strain the liquid — dashi plus ramen-starch — into a container. Dump the remaining ramen noodles mixed with katsuobushi tuna flakes into a bowl and cover with hot marinara sauce.

Results: Not bad. More like a good ramen lunch than a dinner. The ramen was a little dry-tasting (not crunchy-dry, just like it had soaked up all the marinara liquid). I’d do it again, but with more marinara, and, yes, spaghetti instead of ramen. The tuna mixed in nicely, for the most part. Be sure to divide up any clumps before you sauce it.

Rating: *****

 

*mid-June.

 

 

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