Marroats

Marrow has a long and nutritious history. Some of the little we know about the behavior of our proto-hominid ancestors is based on how they cracked their mammoth bones to get the marrow out. Their knowledge has carried down through the ages: animal bone marrows are best. Vegetable marrows, not so much.

We were out of brothmeat, and almost out of broth, so MJ stopped by the store on her way home and bought a nice package of marrowbones. Although they were big and round and marrowsome, they didn’t have much meat on them — the assumption being that you will roast the marrow and have it on toast. I threw them unroasted into the pressure cooker, along with some carrots and an onion and two quarts of water — and a small slab of cube steak for additional flavor. The resulting broth was mild and inoffensive, and the marrow slid out of the bones in two big tubes. When cooled they had the color and consistency of tallow. A fork would mash them, but not smoothly.

After some experiments, I found that what worked best for breakfast was 30-40 grams of marrow, fried and mashed in the pot prior to adding the broth. After that cook it like any other oatmeal.

Setup: 1/2 cup of stone ground rolled oats, one cup of broth, 30-40g of fried and mashed marrow, two dinner teaspoons of potato flakes, salt. Cook for 10 minutes or so, depending on the exact style of oats. Add the potatoes at the end.

Results: Very beefy tasting. Very creamy. Very good. Makes me want to go out and slay things.

Rating: ****

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: