Posts Tagged ‘business models’

Opera Browser: The Long Farewell 5

February 11, 2016

Opera continues to recede into irrelevance. I’m finding my Linux version incompatible with more and more websites (the latest being Penny Arcade), to the point where I’ve built a new folder in Firefox for links that don’t work in Opera. The only reason I still use it is that it has an excellent RSS feed reader — better than Firefox, better than any of the standalone programs I’ve tried.

The latest in the Operatic saga is an offer from a Chinese consortium, including the odious antivirus firm Qihoo, to buy it for 50% more than it’s worth. It’s not clear if they want it for the technology, for their rolodex, or for the espionage possibilities.

Opera Browser: The Long Farewell 4

August 11, 2015

My Opera browser has become less and less compatible with more and more websites, until I find myself reduced to using it as an RSS reader.

Even Opera doesn’t like Opera anymore. Their revenues are down, even counting the more (one cannot say highly anymore) popular mobile browser. A recent report says they are considering a sale of the company. So this time next year, Opera may be a brand and a logo, but no longer a browser. My guess is that Opera will go the same way FoxPro did — bought out and abandoned as a brand and a product, with its components included in Microsoft Access.

Opera Browser: The Long Farewell 2

September 15, 2014

As I wrote last May, the Opera browser was, even then, a mere shell of its former self. It would appear that the decline continues.

Last week I bought a Windows 7 PC. Go ahead and snicker. The fact is, there’s a lot of stuff I have to do for work that can only be done on Windows, and I didn’t want to spend time fiddling with various virtual machines and emulators. Naturally, I keep it in the closet, with just the screen and keyboard showing. Also naturally, I downloaded Opera (24.0), because that’s what one does. The hope is that the Win version is still a decent product.

Not.

The Help/About is as bad as the Mac version. Three paths – to the .exe, to the cache, and to the ‘profile’, whatever that is. But given that I rarely need the paths, I shouldn’t really complain. Except.

The old ‘Hit F12 for site preferences’ functionality is gone. Now I have to dig through the various settings to set the ‘exceptions’ for a website. This makes Opera no better than any of the other browsers.

In the past, Opera would treat each tab individually, even if multiple tabs were looking at different pages of the same site. If I was on a page with lots of fine print, I could hit +++ until I could read the text.* If I had another page from the same website open (e.g. comparing products on Amazon), it wouldn’t be changed. This was good, because not all the tabs needed enlarging. Now, all the tabs from a given website get enlarged or reduced, whatever my preferences are.

Finally, a really cool Opera feature was the “reload every x minutes” function. This was particularly useful for Twitter, but it would help track any other site that refreshed its content rapidly. Now, that’s gone. Right-clicking the page lets you ‘reload’. Anybody can do that. Even Lynx would let you do that.

I suspect these ‘features’ are the result of Opera abandoning Opera and becoming a re-badged Chrome clone. I’ve got nothing against Chrome. Well, their bookmark system is ugly, but so is Firefox’. But if I wanted to run Chrome, I’d do that.

Fortunately, Opera 12 for Linux still retains the old ways. But word is, they’re working on Opera 25 for Linux. I won’t be upgrading.

—————–
* This is personally important to me. It used to be I didn’t have to hit + at all. Then my eyes started to deteriorate and I had to hit it six or seven times. I got computer eyeglasses and all was well, except that my eyes have continued their decline, and now I have to hit + six or ten times, even with the glasses on. I suspect I’ll be getting cataract surgery next Spring.

Opera Browser: The Long Farewell

May 16, 2014

I have been a fan of the Opera browser since you had to pay $30 to run it on the PC. Looking back, that had to be almost as soon as it was publicly available, in 1996 — almost twenty years ago. I have put Opera on every computer I’ve owned this century — Linux, Mac, PC; desktops, laptops, netbooks, tablets… As soon as I got an Android phone, I downloaded Opera Mobile. Opera never had more than 3% of the desktop market, but it made major inroads into mobile, particularly in Europe.

It was always a cutting edge application. For example, Opera was the first browser to provide tabbed browsing, back in 2000, and Speed Dial, in 2007. Then, too, the Norwegian development team seemed to have a bit of a sense of humor. When Microsoft, in one of their periodic episodes of insanity, started deliberately sending Opera users to broken pages, the Opera folks retaliated by translating all Microsoft web pages into …bork…bork…Swedish Chef English.

One of the things I particularly liked was the easy access to advanced and site-specific settings. I’m not real big on flashy displays on websites. Mostly, I go to a site for information, not entertainment or an intrusive sales pitch. I tend to run with everything turned off — cookies, plug-ins, JavaScript, flash, etc. Of course, that breaks a lot of the web, but if I come to a website that needs, say, JavaScript, and I think it’s worth it, I can hit F12, click on “Site Preferences”, and I’m there. Other browsers require you to drill down through multiple layers of menus.

Sadly, a once-great company seems to be abandoning its roots. A year ago, they stopped development of their mobile app, chosing to rebrand Chrome, instead. On the desktop, they seem to have quietly abandoned Linux. One of the co-founders, Jon von Tetzchner, has broken a three-year silence to say that the company had gone to crap.

Earlier this week I upgraded my office Mac to Mountain Lion — it won’t support One Trick Pony. I then upgraded Opera. In the process, it threw away all my bookmarks. That’s not a disaster, because I don’t bookmark a lot of stuff in the office (they frown on loveslavesofthevolcanogodess.com), and I do back up my bookmarks. Now under the old version of Opera, if you went to Help/About, it gave you nine lines of directory entries, telling you were it kept your files. Under the new Opera, I had three: where opera.app was (in applications, duh), where the cache was, and one other, equally useless bit of information.

The latest version of Opera for PCs and Macs is Opera 21.0.14 (released yesterday), for Linux, it’s 12.16, released almost a year ago to update a version first released two years ago. Opera for Linux no longer works with many websites, even with everything turned on, and I’m losing more websites every day.

So, the time has come to pull the plug. I’ll be using Firefox on the Mac and the PC, with Chrome for when I want to run a different browser in a different window. I’ll probably limp along with Opera on the Linux machine, because I still have over 100 RSS feeds there, but more and more of my time seems to be spent on Firefox and Chromium. It’s too bad. Even now, I like the Opera interface. Its method of handling bookmarks seems more intuitive than Firefox, and I didn’t have to download a stupid plugin to get the Speed Dial to work.

And now Mozilla is taking Firefox to the dark side by adding DRM. I guess I’ll have to switch back to Mosaic.

UPS attempts to monetize inefficiency

February 24, 2013

Every now and then we get packages that have to be signed for. Every so often, we’re not home. Recently, in an attempt to improve our hit rate, we’ve signed up for email notification from UPS, telling us what day they will be delivering a package. It’s a great idea. Unfortunately, the marketeers that put it together went a little too far.

What’s the cost to UPS of missing a delivery? That is, showing up with a package that needs a signature, only to find there’s no-one home and having to come back tomorrow. At a minimum, it’s excess travel time on the truck from point A to point B to point C when they could have just gone from A to C, plus excess driver time, plus the run-up-and-knock time. Not a lot, in the overall scheme of things, but it mounts up.

One way to cut down on this cost to UPS, at some hidden cost to the customer, is to let the customer know that their copy of The Heterodyne Boys and the Race to the West Pole will be delivered sometime between 8AM and possibly 7PM next Wednesday (God forbid that they should actually be able to predict AM or PM). That way the customer can hang out at home all day, under the entirely correct assumption that their time is worth nothing…to UPS. Of course, the customer might just decide to blow off the delivery that day in favor of a previously scheduled prostatectomy. In that case, UPS has to come back the next day, and possibly the next.

Even with the advance notification, this is an inefficient system. What’s needed is a system whereby the customer can inform the carrier of when they’ll be home, and the carrier can then schedule the delivery for that day. No missed deliveries, no irate customers, no problems.

Well, UPS has such a system. When you get your notification email, you can go to their website to check on the status. If the scheduled delivery date is a problem, you can go to another page to reschedule. On that page you find you have two options. (1) arrange for you to drive across town to their facility for pickup, or (2) specify a delivery date. By the way. the ‘specify a delivery date’ option costs you $5.00. That’s right. In order to help them improve their delivery efficiency, you have to pay them.

Our next package is due Monday. We might be home. If not, well, c’est le’guerre. They can come back on Tuesday, and if they are really unlucky, on Wednesday — the day we really wanted the delivery on.