Posts Tagged ‘garden gantt chart’

Green Thumb Up My Nose: Plans for 2020

March 2, 2020

It looks like it will be a mild Spring, which means I can plant early, which means I need to get out and fertilize and dig over earlier. Unfortunately, right now, the soil still has chunks of ice in it and windchills are still around 30F. Maybe I’ll stay inside and start the seedlings I should have started last week.

Herewith my crop rotation for this year.

Section 1

Peas, chard, lettuce, carrots maybe cabbage. Note: cabbage will only work if I get a good head-start on it indoors.

Section 2

Peas, squash [Acorn, Spaghetti, Pumpkins], melons [bush varieties]. Note: plant the peas early, so they gain some height over the squash.

Section 3

Tomatoes. Note: tomatoes normally don’t do well in Section 3 — not enough sun — so maybe thin them out a little

Section 4

Asparagus, maybe amaranth.

Deck Containers

The usual tomatoes, only use bigger containers. Maybe try some shallow container lettuce and radish (guttering?)

House Containers

(Eastside)
Tomatoes [try some slicers since sun is a factor], cucumbers. Use planting bags. Use bush cucumbers.

Southside

Abandoning Southside as a food source, except for something-as-yet-undecided in the barrel planter outside the gate.

Here’s my current planning:

Current Schedule

I am also thinking of doing some anti-pest planting, possibly in the smaller deck containers, since they’re not suited for vegetables.

Section 1

mint – aphids, cabbage moth
basil – mosquitoes, whitefly, carrot fly

Section 2

tansy (Tanacetum vulgare) – squash bugs, cutworms
Note: smells bad and is invasive. Plant in container in garden?

Section 3

borage – tomato hornworm

Deck

basil – mosquitoes
pennyroyal – mosquitoes

House

basil – salads

Green Thumb Up My Nose: Lessons Learned from 2019

February 16, 2020

Lessons Learned from 2019

1. Don’t plant any yellow tomatoes. Don’t plant any purple tomatoes. No horticultural reason, we find we just don’t like them as much. We prefer the plain vanilla …er…tomatoes.

2. Fertilize Fall and Spring.

3. Give up on cherry tomatoes and hanging tomatoes.

4. Weed a couple of times a couple of weeks before planting.

5. Use bigger plant signs, particularly for the squash.

6. Photograph and label the initial planting.

Results of 2018 Lessons Learned:

1. Don’t plant: Carolina Gold, any purple tomato. Planted Cherokee Purples in the garden. Didn’t work out

2. Some versions of Champion and Big Boy and Brandywine are determinates. Try staggering the planting. Not sure if staggering the seedling purchase will work. Did not do this. Big Boy did well

3. Process the dirt —  turn over the fallow, fertilize early. Did not process the dirt but did fertilize early (Fall and Spring). Worked well.

4. Until you’ve done (3), don’t use the fallow dirt. Did not use fallow dirt. Used part of it on the front lawn.

5. Try using seed tapes on the carrots and lettuce, et al. Container lettuce worked well. Some of the garden spots worked also, others overcome with weeds. Carrots worked well

6. Be sure you check your plan so you don’t use last year’s planting pattern. I checked.

7. Don’t bother trying to grow plants indoors next winter. Soil temps in the so-called Sun Room never got over 58F. I may try it with lettucoi.

Here’s the results of the 2019 planting pattern:

Section 1
Peas, squash, melons. Plant the peas early, so they gain some height over the squash. Squash worked out well. Did not plant peas

Section 2
Tomatoes. Tomatoes did exceptionally well.

Section 3
Peas, chard, lettuce, carrots maybe cabbage. Not much luck here. Overcome with weeds. Carrots worked well. We are somewhat disillusioned with peas.

Section 4
Asparagus, maybe amaranth. As with Section 3, the weeds did me in. Even the second planting of lettuce didn’t work.

Deck Containers
The usual tomatoes. Early peas. Maybe try some shallow container lettuce and radish. Tomatoes fair. I’m going to give up on cherries. Cucumber gave one cuke.

House Containers (Eastside)
Tomatoes, cucumbers. Tomatoes did well. Long beans did OK, but MJ doesn’t like them. Cukes did nothing.

Southside
Try some container tomatoes with new dirt. Plant more Boston Ivy. Ivy is growing slowly. Put in some Amaranth, which looks nice. Abandoning Southside as a food source.

Gantt Chart for 2019

Green Thumb Up My Nose: Lessons Learned and Plans for 2019

January 29, 2019

Lessons Learned from 2018 and plans for 2019

Lessons Learned:

1. Don’t plant: Carolina Gold, any purple tomato

2. Some versions of Champion and Big Boy and Brandywine are determinates. Try staggering the planting. Not sure if staggering the seedling purchase will work.

3. Process the dirt —  turn over the fallow, fertilize early.

4. Until you’ve done (3), don’t use the fallow dirt.

5. Try using seed tapes on the carrots and lettuce, et al.

6. Be sure you check your plan so you don’t use last year’s planting pattern.

7. Don’t bother trying to grow plants indoors next winter. Soil temps in the so-called Sun Room never got over 58F, and three months after planting my indoor cabbage had six leaves.

8. However, here’s some hints on starting seeds indoors

Here’s the preliminary 2019 planting pattern:*

Section 1
Peas, squash, melons. Plant the peas early, so they gain some height over the squash.

Section 2
Tomatoes. Start seeds indoors early March, transplant early May. Depending on what’s at the nursery, put out seedlings in early May.

Section 3
Peas, chard, lettuce, carrots maybe cabbage. Start planting chard, lettuce, and carrots in early April. Plant more every three weeks.

Section 4
Asparagus, maybe amaranth. Looking for something permanent, that can take a fair amount of shade.

Deck Containers
The usual tomatoes. Early peas. Maybe try some shallow container lettuce and radish

House Containers (Eastside)
Tomatoes, cucumbers.

Southside
Try some container tomatoes with new dirt. Plant more Boston Ivy.

*which is mostly the 2018 plan, because I didn’t do (6.)

This is looking to be an El Nino year, so I think I can get started early on the planting.

Gantt Chart for 2019

Green Thumb Up My Nose: Plans for 2018

February 1, 2018

Getting ready to order seeds for Spring. It’s still a La Nina year, but it hasn’t been all that cold, or wet. Right now (1 Feb), there’s no snow on the ground, and the highs have hit the upper 40’s at times. The current weekly forecast is for lows in the mid 30’s, and highs in the mid 40’s, with rain. More like March than February.

Here’s the preliminary 2018 Plan:

Section 1
Peas, cucumbers, carrots. Maybe Squash, melons.

Section 2
Tomatoes.

Section 3
Greens, lettuce, maybe cabbage.

Section 4
Asparagus, maybe amaranth. Looking for something permanent, that can take a fair amount of shade.

Deck Containers
The usual tomatoes

House Containers
Tomatoes, cucumbers

Southside
TBD

Green Thumb Up My Nose: Lessons Learned and Plans for 2017

January 31, 2017

Lessons learned:
Not much new here. Don’t plant in the shade (yard shade and Section 4), and don’t plant short plants north of tall plants. The only brassicae worth trying are cabbages, and even then it’s a crapshoot. Beans are more trouble thant they are worth. Peas are OK. Burdock needs a lot of time to develop roots worth taking. Don’t expect your tomatoes to be more than tennis ball size.

Plans for 2017:
It’s a mild La Nina year, so we’re cooler and wetter. At the end of January there’s still eight inches of snow on the ground, including some from late November. I’m still going to plant early, but with less hope of useful results.

gardengantt2017

Continuing our medieval field rotation we have

Section 1
Tomatoes.

Section 2
Greens, lettuce, maybe cabbage. Yes, this violates the no shorts north of talls rule, but if I start the short stuff off early, it will be well developed before the tomatoes start to shade them

Section 3
Peas, cucumbers, carrots.

Section 4
Squash, melons, asparagus, maybe amaranth. Still looking for a purpose for Section 4.

Deck Containers
The usual tomatoes

House Containers
Tomatoes, cucumbers

Southside
Dig up the hops. Never gave that much shade, and I’m no longer interested in climbing around on the roof to mount/dismount the netting. Remove all the dirt (pesticides), and use it on the front lawn. Add new dirt, with lots of coffee grounds, and some blueberries.

Green Thumb Up My Nose: Plans for 2016

November 25, 2015

We are in an El Nino cycle, probably a strong one. That means the NENW will likely be warmer than usual (precip probabilities are split between less and more). And that means we can try planting out even earlier. Like early to mid April. In keeping with earlier approach, I’m rotating the fields again. This time, Section 4 is in the main rotation.

Crops to be grown
Tall crops (including climbers)
Peas
Green Beans (small planting)
Lima Beans
Tomatoes
Amaranth

Short crops
Greens, of course
Asparagus
Carrots
Squash (winter, summer, pumpkin)
Cucumbers (Lemon)

Containers
Tomatoes
Lemon cucumbers
Peppers (not-chiles)

New Ideas
Melons
Cucumbers (European)

Section 1
Brassicae. Yes, I know. Trying some clever timing tricks.
See the Gantt Chart
Carrots. Maybe the amaranth goes here

Section 2
Peas and beans. Maybe cucumbers.

Section 3
Squash. Maybe melons

Section 4
Tomatoes.* Asparagus.

The Schedule

early Feb – Start seeds indoors
early April (60 days later) – move to greenhouse
mid March — transplant cabbage and bok choy
early May — transplant other things
early July (70 days) – early varieties ripen
late July (90 days) – late varieties ripen

 

Garden Gantt 2016

Garden Gantt 2016

*We did a tomato tasting this evening, before the last of the tomatoes goes off. Conclusions were:

The red tomatoes were OK, and mostly indistinguishable — Brandywine, Celebrity, Champion, and Early Girl. The only small red tomato, the Zebras, were tart and very thick skinned. The small yellow Lemons were not as tart as the bigger yellow Cougars. The yellow Brandywines were Brandywine-sized and knobbly, and didn’t taste that much different from the run of the mill reds. Note — although it said Red Brandywine on the tin, I expect the labels got switched, because they were nowhere near as big as the yellows, and were shaped nothing like them. I’ll have to think on this when Spring comes.