Posts Tagged ‘GOP’

Don’t give Trump all the credit

December 11, 2016

I’ve been reading the news, like the news junkie I am, and it’s all about Trump — Trump appointed him, Trump appointed her, Trump’s new policies will transform this, that, and the other government programs. Trump is a loose cannon. Trump is nothing like a true Republican. The GOP will rue the day they handed the reins to Trump. You would think that he’s already a dictator, rather than being only an incipient autocrat.

In reality, Trump represents the heart and soul of the Republican Party. He is appointing to cabinet positions the same kind of people that the Republicans have always wanted in those positions: rich businesspeople with opinions directly opposite those in previous Democratic administrations. Think of all the headlines “Trump appoints an opponent of X to head the X department”. This is not Trump going off the rails, this is Trump adhering to the deepest, darkest wishes of the GOP core.

Or take budget deficits, and stimulus packages, and the like. The Republicans are the party of fiscal responsibility and low deficits, right? Wrong! The Republicans are the party who say they are for fiscal responsibility and low deficits. But which of our modern Presidents drove up our debt as a percentage of GDP? Reagan. Bush. Also, Bush. Who drove them down? Carter. Clinton. Obama didn’t because deficit spending is what you need to get you out of a near-depression. The Republicans love deficit spending, as long as it’s on their terms, on their projects, and isn’t done by some uppity Democrat.

By attributing all these actions to Trump, the person, we miss Trump the personification of the new GOP. We give them the opportunity to plausibly deny his actions, come the next election cycle, and skate out from under the blame. “We voted for Trump, and Trump failed us” the voters will say. NO. You voted for the most Republican of all Republicans, and it was the Republicans who failed you. Republican.

Don’t let our fascination with the showman in front of the curtain obscure the truth of the matter. When the histories are written, when responsibility is properly assigned, the word Republican will go down as one of those words that, like Quisling, evokes a regime fraught with deceit and betrayal.

Why I am voting for Hillary

November 6, 2016

A recent essay by (retired, disabled veteran) Jim Wright over on Stone Kettle Station resonates perfectly with my feelings. As I read them, his key points are that the GOP has abandoned all sense of humanity and true individual freedom and responsibility, has based its economic policies on grinding down the poor to serve the rich, and has thrown out diplomacy in its love for yet another war. This is all true, but it leaves out some issues.

He left out the fact that it was a Republican (elected by a politicized Supreme Court) who got us into the Iraq war, who perverted the Intelligence process, who spat on every professional standard I know (and if you want to swap that p for an h, I won’t argue).

It was a Republican who started us on the slippery slope to a surveillance state, who authorized torture of the innocent, and who doesn’t dare step out of the country for fear of being arrested as a war criminal.

He left out the fact that, in the face of a re-run of the Great Depression (brought on by Republican policies), the response of the GOP was to declare that their primary goal was to make Obama a one-term President. This is a naked admission that their driving objective is power, and they don’t care how they get it.

These things are also true, and combined with Wright’s arguments they make a strong case for not voting Republican.

But my vote, and I think, his, is not merely a vote against. It’s a vote for.

Hillary Clinton is a professional politician, and that’s a good thing. As a Democrat, she believes in the ability and duty of government to work to improve the lot of all the people, and not in the pursuit of power for its own sake. As a Clinton, she has survived a quarter century of accusations and innuendo. As a woman, she will bring a much-needed dose of serotonin to the office. All of those things make a vote for Hillary a no-brainer.

So, yeah, I’m voting for Hillary.

 

The intellectual implosion of the GOP

September 27, 2015

A couple of weeks ago, Paul Krugman had an item in the NYT titled Charlatans, Cranks, and Apparatchiks, on the kind of people who support Jeb! Bush’s tax policies. He also had a link to a great comment on how they got started:

There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.

My two cents on Trump

August 12, 2015

In 2008 the Republican Party suffered a massive nervous breakdown. This happened as a result of them unexpectedly losing an election that everyone but them knew they were going to lose. The fact that they were, to echo a Churchillian phrase, both beaten and puzzled, shows how tenouous their grip on reality was in the first place. Their loss was not only unexpected but it was a loss to a Democratic candidate who embodied everything they were against, everything they hated — a vast collection of traits perhaps best summarized in a single word “Uppity“. That sudden exposure to reality drove them absolutely stark, staring, barking mad.

How mad? Well, mad enough to think about sabotaging their own country. In their efforts to ensure that Obama was a one-term President, they did their absolute best to trash the economy. We know how to get out of a recession, even a Great Recession: the government spends money. Lots of money. During the Great Depression, Roosevelt’s biggest blunder is generally acknowledged to be cutting back on the spending too soon. But that didn’t matter. Now that Uppity was in the White House, the GOP switched from running some of the largest deficits in history to whining that anything other than a balanced budget would undermine the economy, the solidity of the dollar, and probably the sanctity of marriage as well.

How mad? Well, mad enough to to go insane over a non-existent gun control threat. Democratic Presidents are generally for gun control but are unable to do much about it. Carter was. Clinton was. But there were no loud-mouthed, wool-hatted, rednecked, right-wing extremists patrolling outside of their speaking engagements carrying firearms in support of the Second Amendment and comparing them to Satan, or Carpathia, or other Biblical figures. Mad enough to believe that a multi-state training exercise like Jade Helm was an attempt to take over Texas and steal their guns.

How mad? Well, four years later the GOP ran essentially the same campaign, with, OK not the same candidate but with his ideological and intellectual clone, expecting that this time they’d really win, and of course they lost, again.

But that’s history, even if it’s recent history, and even if there are people who still don’t have a home or a job, or a future because of the events of 2008 and the GOP’s actions afterwards. Let’s not sweat the small stuff. Let’s look to the nation‘s future. Let’s consider what’s happening with the GOP primary campaign in 2015. As satirist P.J. O’Rourke said last June about the possible candidates, they are all pygmies (to be fair, he’s including Clinton and Biden as well).

That’s not a list of presidential candidates. That’s a list of congressionally appointed members of a bipartisan blue-ribbon commission named to look into a question of pressing national importance such as “paper or plastic?”

Of course, the stand-out amongst them is Donald Trump. Everyone agrees he has no chance of getting the nomination, but he is certainly getting the attention. On the home page of yesterday’s Washington Post online there were seventeen headlines dealing with the Presidential race (some were repeats under different headings). Seven of them were about Trump. The New York Times online edition had nine mentions of Trump, and seven mentions of all other campaign personalities. Of course, a mention doesn’t have to be political. Three of the NYT mentions of Trump were various headers on Stephen Colbert’s Night Show. But the fact remains, that Trump is sucking up the lion’s share of the coverage. And that’s good for the GOP.

It’s good for the GOP because they are all pygmies. They are all failures, at business or government, or life. Each one of them has some one useful trait that has propelled them into the ranks of serious candidates. Not one of them has a collection of traits that would make a good President. And where they fall short, where their vision fails, they fall back on the tried and true GOP policy positions that lost the last two elections. They blow on their dog whistles until their lips are chapped, but gently, discreetly, and not in a way that might cause people to think they were extremists, or incompetents, just loud enough to alert the base. And then along came Trump.

Trump isn’t saying anything that any of the others don’t believe, he’s just saying it louder, with more bombast and bravado. He’s giving them political cover, making it possible to say the un-sayable, as long as they do it discreetly, and not like him.   But there’s more to it that that.

There’s a concept called the news hole. It refers to the fact that there is only so much time on national television news, only so much space on the front pages of national newspapers, only so much time available for reading even the most insightful of blogs. There’s even, and I know this is hard to believe, a limit on how much can be covered in one 24hr cycle of talk radio. And if it doesn’t get covered, then by definition, it’s not news. Every day editors of one stripe or another must decide what goes in and what goes away. It’s the basis for content analysis, a concept going back at least to the OSS exploitation of German newspapers in WWII.

By hogging the limelight, by filling up the news hole, Trump has limited the media’s ability to ask penetrating questions of the real candidates. You can see this in the numbers for the first debate, where even bleed’n Megyn Kelly was guilty of spending too much time on Trump, and not enough time on the other candidates. You can see it today on the home pages of the Washington Post and the New York Times. Even The Economist, no chaser-after of glib headlines, with five US Presidential campaign articles on the first page of their Politics section, mentions Trump twice and leads with his picture on a third article.

Of course, questions do keep being asked. Insightful questions like: Is Trump serious? Is there a way to beat Trump? Will Trump really pick Sarah Palin as his running mate? Sometimes they are even asked of the candidates: Mr. Candidate, how would you respond to Trump’s characterization of illegal immigrants?

Very few are the probing kinds of policy questions that would expose these pygmies for what they are. And that means that whoever gets the GOP nomination, almost a year from now, will have had a year to skate on the hard questions, will have dodged a year’s worth of scrutiny.

That’s the gift that The Donald is giving to the GOP, and they should be grateful.

GOP Solidarity

October 7, 2013

Everyone knows Republicans walk side by side to overstate their numbers. — Ben Kenobe

Obstructionism

July 10, 2013

I didn’t used to pay a lot of attention to politics. For a third of a century or more I was a pretty good Republican. I voted for the man, not the party (and no, there weren’t any women), but it always turned out to be GOP.

What first drove me away from the party, fat old white guy that I am, was the insanity of the post-9/11 wars. What’s kept me away from the party is their insane obstructionism. Everybody says both sides do it, but that’s not true. Or, what’s true is that both sides did it on occasion, and neither side did it as a basic part of their self-image. It was a tactic, not a strategy. The danger, as the doctors say, is in the dosage. What might be healthful and restorative in small doses (excuse me while I make a quick trip to the wine cellar) can become deadly when it’s all you consume, or when it becomes all-consuming.

John Cole, over at Balloon Juice, has an interesting item on this same topic. In it, he does a thought experiment on what the Dems might have done to block the 2003 Medicare drug legislation. Might have done, but didn’t.

That “but didn’t” is the reason I continue to vote Democratic, despite the fact that I fall squarely in the center of the GOP’s natural constituency. One of the things I’ve realized is that, while it’s important to vote for the person, you have to look beyond them, at the behavior that will emerge because that person is a member of a specific party.

The GOP and America

September 5, 2011

Normally I don’t post links or comments unless I have something useful to add, but these two links are important.

President Reagan’s Director of the OMB, on how the GOP is destroying America.

And here’s a senior GOP Congressional staffer who just retired after 28 years, including service on the House and Senate Budget Committees. He couldn’t take it any more. Here’s his view of today’s GOP. Senior Congressional staffers are incredibly powerful — they not only know where all the bodies are buried, they helped bury most of them.

These are not wild-eyed leftists. They both held responsible positions in the executive and legislative branches of the government. One of them is writing for the Wall Street Journal. You don’t get better conserva-cred than that. And they’re both saying the same thing. The GOP is in thrall to the corporate world and is willing to destroy the country to achieve their goals.

At least they are consistent

It’s inconceivable to me how any thinking person can read these, look at the hard evidence, and then vote for any GOP candidate for a position higher than County Commissioner of Sanitation.