Posts Tagged ‘oatmeal extenders’

Oatmeal Chili — 3

June 22, 2017

Two and a half years ago, I made oatmeal with some ground beef chili that MJ had made. Half a year ago, I made oatmeal with the liquid from a beef strip chili that MJ had made. Half an hour ago, I made oatmeal with a quarter cup of commercial canned chili.

MJ was off doing all the busy things she does, and we were flat out of dinner fixings. I mean fresh, meat-and-veg style fixings. Fortunately, we have a fairly extensive pantry, so when I got hungry I just opened the pantry drawer and had a look around. First thing in front was a can of Hormel Turkey Chili with Beans. I can tell you that it tastes just like … canned chili. Overcooked, with unbalanced seasoning that tastes like it’s based not so much on flavor as it is on what the linear programming algorithm cranks out as the most profitable mixture of spices. However, if you dump it on top of enough lettuce, and then dump enough cheese on top of that, it will keep body and soul together — and as for your taste buds, two out of three isn’t bad. I mean, it’s 98% fat free, and where’s the fun in that? Needless to say there were leftovers, or as I call them, dregs.

Setup: 1/2 cup of stone ground rolled oats, one cup of clove-heavy broth*, quarter cup of HTCB, two dinner teaspoons of potato flakes, salt. Cook for 10 minutes or so, depending on the exact style of oats. Add the potatoes at the end.

Results: Meh. The ground turkey was detectable only in a granular change to the mouthfeel. Every now and then there was a bean. The overwhelming impression was … the seasonings were unbalanced, and not because of the cloves. Cheese helped a lot, but then, it always does.

Rating: **

*Every now and then I think to add cloves to the pressure cooker when making broth. Unfortunately, those times are far enough apart that I forget how much cloves can dominate. By clove-heavy, I mean six cloves in a quart. You don’t have to follow my recipes slavishly. Two cloves will do, and they won’t turn your broth an evil swamp-water black.

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Granola Dregs

May 19, 2017

MJ had a bag of Nature Valley Granola Crunch — animal cracker-sized granola tidbits. Thing about granola bars is, they crumble, and the tidbitty things crumble faster. So when she was done with the 21 bars equivalent, she still had a good cup of granola…dregs…in the bag. Of course, granola is mostly oats, the bits that aren’t soy or honey, so it should work well with oats.

Setup: 1/3 cup of stone ground rolled oats, one cup of beef broth, quarter cup of granola dregs, salt. Cook for 10 minutes or so, depending on the exact style of oats. Add the granola towards the end — early enough to heat, late enough that it doesn’t mush.

Results: Yay! New breakfast treat. Nutty-oaty flavor. Maybe I’ll go buy a whole bag, and a hammer.

Rating: ****

Sweet PotatOats

November 17, 2016

My previous adventures with sweet potatoes and oatmeal have been with what might be called commercial preparations: potato puffs and restaurant chips. This time it was personal. I had just sent MJ a list of thirty-some sweet potato recipes what had been collecting in my RSS feed for the last year or so. She retaliated by making chocolate brownies using a white sweet potato base. They tasted like a wartime substitute but we found that with enough toppings (non-dairy creamer, Irish Cream liqueur, rum liqueur, gin,  etc) we were able to finish them off. That left about half a cup of the original sweet potato, mashed. It tasted more like sweet…potato than sweetpotato.

Setup: 1/3 cup of stone ground rolled oats, one cup of broth, two fat dinner teaspoons of mashed white sweet potato, salt. Cook for 10 minutes or so, depending on the exact style of oats.

Results: A very nice addition to the collection. The sweet potato was mild enough that it enhanced the oat flavor (what little there was) without getting into a fight with it.

Rating: *****

Squashed Oatmeal

September 8, 2016

Summer is coming to an end and the great green and yellow tide of squash is rolling over us. MJ made a nice stir-fry with onion, garden tomatoes, and garden squash, seasoned with ponzu, Worcestershire, and salt-free all purpose seasoning. Very good, and there were some leftovers.

Meanwhile, we had some heavily gnawed pork ribs, left over from when I was away on a trip, and a couple of chunks of unidentifiable fast food chicken parts, covered in special fast food batter, that I combined in the pressure cooker to make broth with. Not bad, but it still had a hint of stale batter.

Setup: 1/3 cup of stone ground rolled oats, one cup of fast food broth, two dinner teaspoons of potato flakes, a quarter cup of squash-based stir-fry. Cook for 10 minutes or so, depending on the exact style of oats. Add the squash a minute before you are done, and the potatoes at the very end.

Results: Very good. Onions always work well in oatmeal, the squash still had some crunch, and there were not enough tomatoes to clash with the flavor — in general, tomatoes don’t work in oatmeal, it’s not spaghetti.

Rating: *****

Chicken Noodle Oats

June 16, 2016

MJ was off doing churchly things the other night and I was left on my own, to fend for yourself, as she put it. I’m used to fending, so I dug around the kitchen and found a half-used can of spaghetti sauce and a half-empty box of miniature spaghetti — thin spaghetti noodles about an inch long, terrible for winding on your fork (even if you use a spoon), but good for a quick spaghetti dinner. I ate all the sauce, but there was a cup or so of noodles left. Noodles and sauce are about as hard to balance as milk and cookies. The next morning I mixed about a half a cup of them (it’s hard to measure noodles) with this week’s chicken broth.

Setup: 1/3 cup of stone ground rolled oats, one cup of broth, half a cup of leftover miniature spaghetti noodles, two dinner teaspoons of potato flakes, salt. Cook for 10 minutes or so, depending on the exact style of oats. Add the potatoes at the end.

Results: Most excellent. Tasted just like chicken-noodle soup with added oatmeal. You need a good, strong broth though.

Rating: *****

Black Chicken Oatmeal

June 2, 2016

MJ went out to lunch with friends yesterday, and came home with a doggie bag for me — she’s a light eater, and I don’t mind dog food. It was a strangely jarring meal of adventuresome ideas that didn’t quite work. First was the blackened chicken. Blackened, to me, means heavily black peppered, which makes it taste a little hot, but not capsaicined. This time, the chef decided that if spicy was good, then spicy would be even better, and added a generous amount of red pepper. Too, too spicy. Then there were the french-fries, made from sweet potatoes. Normally I like them, but here, the chef remained adventuresome and seasoned them with what I think was cinnamon. Didn’t work. Finally, there were noodles with an unidentified herb, that also didn’t go. It was like this guy was the first one to get dropped on the cooking show Chopped.

Nonetheless, I stood by my motto: If it’s leftover, it’s breakfast. Chopped up the chicken and the potatoes (I’d finished the noodles the night before) and mixed them in with the oatmeal. Kept a handful of shredded cheese and a tablespoon of sour cream on standby for if the heat remained too hot.

Setup: 1/3 cup of stone ground rolled oats, one cup of broth, about half a cup of the chicken and sweet potato mix, two dinner teaspoons of potato flakes, salt. Cook for 10 minutes or so, depending on the exact style of oats. Add the potatoes at the end.

Results: Marginal. Still too spicy. Shredded cheese helped, as did the sour cream. Not inedible, but not something I’d serve company. Or the dogs.

Rating: *****

TacOats

May 19, 2016

We were looking for a quick meal the other night and found a package of chicken taco mix in the meat drawer. It’s a pre-packaged package of chunked chicken meat, seasoned with taco seasonings. We didn’t feel like tacos, so MJ made a kindofa chile: can of beans, can of chopped tomatoes, package of chicken taco filling. There was lots, so there was lots of leftovers.

Setup: 1/3 cup of stone ground rolled oats, one cup of broth, two fat dinner teaspoons of chicken taco chile mix, two dinner teaspoons of potato flakes, salt. Cook for 10 minutes or so, depending on the exact style of oats. Add the potatoes at the end, plus a grab-handful of shredded cheese.

Results: Pretty good, despite the fact that oatmeal and tomatoes don’t play well together. Not sure why. It’s not just the cooked tomato taste (which I’m not a fan of) because oatmeal and ketchup don’t work either. In any event, the chicken and the spices and the cheese overpowered the tomatoes to make an agreeable meal.

Rating: *****

Olive Oats

February 4, 2016

Two years ago, I had a a horrible, terrible, no good at all, experience trying Kalimata olives in my oatmeal. This time I’m trying sliced black olives, the kind you find on a certain style of tacos, or salad, or celery with cream cheese. We had opened a can and had used most of them on tacos, and salad, and celery with cream cheese, but there was about a quarter cup of olive dregs left, along with a half cup of the olive water. It had been long enough ago that the trauma had faded, so I tried again.

Setup: 1/3 cup of stone ground rolled oats, quarter cup of sliced black olives and half a cup of water from the can (probably should use a third of a cup and adjust the broth), half a cup of broth, two dinner teaspoons of potato flakes, no salt. Cook for 10 minutes or so, depending on the exact style of oats. Add the potatoes at the end. Fat pinch of shredded cheese.

Results: Pretty good. A little salty. Olive flavor came thrugh nicely. Were I to do it again I think I’d put the olives in at the last moment. Cheese helped.

Rating: *****

Oatmeal And Wilted Lettuce

January 21, 2016

Remember your elementary school cafeteria, where they’d feed you yesterday’s lettuce soaked in boiling vinegar and sugar, with a topping of nice healthy bacon? Suppose you could recapture those memories at breakfast time, so they come back to you all day long? We had some shredded lettuce that MJ bought for taco making, and you know how fast shredded lettuce goes off, so I helped her use up the leftovers, just like the schooldays.

Setup: 1/3 cup of stone ground rolled oats, one cup of broth, half a cup of lettuce, chopped and loosely loaded, two tablespoons of vinegar, two packets of sweetener (trying to stay healthy here), and three strips of crisp bacon, chopped up, salt. Cook for 10 minutes or so, depending on the exact style of oats. Add the lettuce and the bacon for the last minute. You don’t want it to go all soggy.

Results: Surprisingly good. You’ll have to play with the ingredients to get it to taste the way you like, but it gave a nice, tart start to the day.

Rating: *****

TacOatmeal Boat

September 24, 2015

Last night, MJ made an experimental recipe — half a spaghetti squash shell, used as a baking boat and filled with the squash innards, plus a handful of miniature  frozen Swedish meatballike things, a halfcup or so of salsa, a halfcup or so of black beans, and the remnants of a package of taco seasonings. Baked for a bit, and finished off with a sprinkle of cheese on the top (toasted under the broiler). Most excellent, and there was mix left over.

I used about a third of a cup (minus the meatballs), so that makes it an oatmeal extender, rather than just an ingredient.

Setup: 1/3 cup of stone ground rolled oats, third of a cup of spaghetti squash taco bean mix, one cup of broth (beef), salt.  Cook for 10 minutes or so, depending on the exact style of oats.

Results: Very good. Put some cheese on top, but didn’t finish it off under the broiler.

Rating: *****

Strawberry-Banana Oatmeal Extender

September 17, 2015

I have written about bananas and oatmeal a couple times before, but mostly about banana chips. What about a real banana? Keep in mind that a real banana is a massive thing, as oatmeal additives go, so what we are really talking about here is using a banana as an oatmeal extender.

MJ had a banana left over from a dog trip. It was exceedingly brown on the outside, and anyone’s guess about the inside. What the heck. Let’s try it.

Turns out, it wasn’t that bad on the inside. A couple of light brown spots, and the texture was crumbly-mashable. Icky to eat in your hand, precarious if you ate it from the peel, good tasting if you ate it on your plate. I put it in a 50/50 mix of apple juice and beef broth. Apple juice wants to dominate things, and it tastes surprisingly sour when cooked.

Halfway through the cooking process, I remembered that we still had a box of strawberries left from our next-to-latest Follow The Harvest delivery (organic freshfruity things hand delivered every week)*. They were pretty far gone, but not inedible. Sort of. I cut up about half of them and dumped them in towards the end. Call it half a cup. Added a tablespoon of sugar. Cooked the whole mess for 15min insted of 10.

Setup: 1/3 cup of stone ground rolled oats, one really ripe banana (mashed in the pot), half a cup of really ripe strawberries (mashed in the pot), half cup of broth, half cup of apple juice, salt (yes, it needs salt — it’s oatmeal).  Cook for 15 minutes or so, depending on the exact style of oats.

Results: Very good, but it needed something. Maybe cinnamon on top. Came out surprisingly soupy. I guess both the banana and the strawberries had more internal water than I credited them with. Next time maybe just half a cup of apple juice.

Rating: *****

*They only delivered the strawberries, not the banana, sorry.

Oats de la Mer 3

February 26, 2015

This is different from our previous oceanic oatmeal. This one involves fish. You see, MJ recently brought home a package of pre-breaded fish fillets. Some sort of whitefish. Sweet-potato-based breadcrumbs. There was one fillet left over.

I decided to go minimalist on this one, since the fish had lots of seasoning. I also decided that our decidedly beefy beef broth was too turf for this surf, so I went with plain water, and a scant quarter teaspoon of dashi granules. That’s still twice what they recommend.

Setup: 1/3 cup of stone ground rolled oats, one quarter cup of chopped up breaded fish fillet, two dinner teaspoons of potato flakes, one cup of water, one quarter teaspoon of dashi grains, no salt.  Cook for 10 minutes or so, depending on the exact style of oats.  Add the potato when you take it off the stove.

Results: Very good. Very aquatic. I’ve got half a fillet left. I might try it again, with seaweed and shoyu.

Rating: *****

Oatmeal Stuffing

February 19, 2015

Or maybe, stuffing oatmeal. For breakfast, not for stuffing stuff.

We had roast chicken the other day, and in a moment of hastiness, MJ bought a box of bread stuffing to go with it. Standard commercial product, essentially sage and onion croutons, with the odd crazin thrown in. Wasn’t all that bad, when topped with MJ’s home-made chicken gravy. There was lots left over, so I thought I’d try it as an oatmeal extender.

Setup: 1/3 cup of stone ground rolled oats, 1/3 cup of bread stuffing, two dinner tablespoons of chicken gravy, two dinner teaspoons of potato flakes, one cup of chicken broth, salt.  Cook for 10 minutes or so, depending on the exact style of oats.  Add the stuffing and gravy at the start, and the potato when you take it off the stove.

Results: Not bad. I’ll definitely make it again, should we ever come up long on stuffing. The bread sort of disintegrated into a bread pudding consistency with a surprising amount of liquid.  Was sloppy enough that I added a third teaspoon of potato flakes. Was salty enough that I didn’t have to add any additional salt, and what does that say about your commercial product salt content?

Rating: *****

Blueberry-Banana Oatmeal

January 29, 2015

This is more of a traditional style of oatmeal. On a whim, I bought a carton of blueberries, encouraged by reports that they help lower blood pressure, but (it turns out) only if you eat enough of them to earn a new nickname. We also had some leftover banana chips, remnants of intermittent attempts at trail mix. These are the hard-dried, crunchy chips. The ones that don’t really taste like bananas. For the liquid, well, we’re still working our way through the goosebroth, which has got to be better than plain water. I mean, we’re cooking, not washing.

Setup: 1/3 cup of stone ground rolled oats, two dinner teaspoons of potato flakes, 1/3 cup of blueberries, 1/3 cup of banana chips, one cup of broth, salt.  Cook for 10 minutes or so, depending on the exact style of oats.  Add the berries & chips when you start the broth, and the potato when you take it off the stove.

Results: Very good. Needed a teaspoon of sugar to bring out the fruitiness. Looked vaguely purple, due to the blueberries. There was a distinct bananalike air about it, but nothing like when I used real bananas. The banana chips themselves softened, but didn’t come apart — much like lightly fried sliced potatoes — and tasted more like plantains. The goose broth added a useful dimension, but beef or mandrill would probably have done as well.

Rating: *****

Oatmeal Chili

January 15, 2015

Being fed up (ha ha) with holiday fare, MJ made some chili. Nothing special. Ground beef, onions, some of our garden tomato sauce, commercial chili powder. Cooked on the stove, not sous vide nor in the slow cooker. It turned out not bad. Just spicy enough. Lots left over.

Setup: 1/3 cup of stone ground rolled oats, 1/3 cup of leftover chili, two dinner teaspoons of potato flakes, one cup of broth, salt.  Cook for 10 minutes or so, depending on the exact style of oats.  Add the potato when you take it off the stove..

Results: It turned out not bad. The oatmeal cut the chili flavor and left it tasting more like …  I don’t know … a sloppy Joe, maybe. A tomato-y hamburger stew. Not overly bland, and not overly chili-ish. I will certainly try it again, when the leftover roll round.

Rating: *****

Black Bean Oatmeal

January 1, 2015

Back in early December, in that space between holidays when one fights to keep the weight off, in preparation for putting the weight on, MJ made some beans and rice, served on a bed of spinach.  The beans were canned, and heated on the stove. The rice was short grain, brown, and cooked in the pressure cooker for twenty minutes. The sauce was made with the last of our garden tomatoes — they were too far gone to use in a salad, but not black or furry or thingy. The broth was newly-made, also in the pressure cooker, using smoked pork neckbones. Pretty good, for simple country fare. The leftovers ended up in my oatmeal.

I used two fat teaspoons, at least a third of a cup, along with more of the pork broth. Not being sure if it would need salt after all that, I held off until the end.

Setup: 1/3 cup of stone ground rolled oats, two dinner teaspoons of black beans and brown rice, two dinner teaspoons of potato flakes, one cup of pork neck broth, salt.  Cook for 10 minutes or so, depending on the exact style of oats.  Add the beans and rice and bring it up to steaming before you put in the oatmeal, and the potato and salt-to-taste when you take it off the stove.

Results: Very good. The tomatoes and herbs were noticeable. The rice was chewy, as brown rice is wont to be (you could probably go another five or ten minutes in the pressure cooker if you like). The beans were there, but not intrusive. This would be a good side dish for dinner when unexpected guests drop in (or are still there New Year’s morning) and you need an extender. This is one of the few dishes where I’d consider using steel-cut oatmeal, so the chewy rice and chewy oatmeal could fight it out for who would fit in the space where your dental filling was.

Rating: *****

My Grandmother’s Stuffing Oatmeal

December 11, 2014

She is?

Actually, it’s not my grandmother’s stuffing. It’s something that started out to be, but lost its way on the way to being something else entirely. We were making it for a Thanksgiving not-exactly-a-potluck Dinner. MJ started out all enthusiastic about recreating an authentic stuffing experience, but then got into the cooking sherry. First change was, don’t peel the potatoes, ’cause we’re running late. Then, all we had was a packet of gizzards — no hearts, livers, or necks. Yeah, and the bread. It had to be gluten free, which kindof kills the whole point. After that, why not add celery, ya know?  So we ended up with something that was not quite, but almost, totally unlike my grandmother’s stuffing. Tasted good though.

Setup: 1/3 cup of stone ground rolled oats, two big sloppy dinner tablespoons of a suitably festive potato stuffing (call it 1/4 cup), one cup of broth, salt.  Cook for 10 minutes or so, depending on the exact style of oats.  Add the potato before you add the oats. It’s like risotto, needs breaking down.

Results: Very good. Filling. One might even say, Stuffing. Goes well with hot gravy poured over it. Would probably been even better if it were closer to the original. I’ll put it in the holiday rotation.

Rating: *****

Oatmeal Risotto

December 4, 2014

Sometimes I go overboard. MJ was off on a trip, and I had a bunch of boneless chicken thighs. There was a good looking recipe for slow cooker rice and chicken thighs (with onions and mushrooms), so why not. Except I didn’t have any regular rice. Well Arborio will do just as well, right? Wrong. Arborio is designed for risotto, and wants three cups of water per cup of rice, instead of one or one and a half. By the time I was done I had enough risotto-style rice to feed a family of four for a week. Longer, if they didn’t like their kids.

Next day, I started on the long process of using up all that leftover rice, and the first place was as an oatmeal extender.

Setup: 1/3 cup of stone ground rolled oats, 1/4 cup of risotto, one cup of broth, salt.  Cook for 10 minutes or so, depending on the exact style of oats. Add the rice before you add the oats, so the glutenous mass can break up properly.

Results: Very good. All the flavors came through, and the overall result was something you could serve as a side-dish for dinner. I don’t plan on making it again.

Rating: *****

Ham-n-Cabbage Oats

September 4, 2014

So, we had half a head of cabbage from the garden, one that was getting pretty elderly with the black spot syndrome. I discarded all the evil bits, and ended up with about a cup of chopped cabbage. Perfect for use as an oatmeal extender. I used a half a cup for this experiment, and will have a different take on the recipe next week. For broth, I had the ham-hock broth that MJ had made in the pressure cooker last week. Not too hammy, but flavorsome.

Setup: 1/3 cup of stone ground rolled oats, half a cup of moderate chop cabbage, loose pack, two dinner teaspoons of potato flakes, one cup of ham broth, no salt (because ham).  Cook for 10 minutes or so, depending on the exact style of oats.  Add the cabbage at the five minute point (don’t want to overcook), and the potato when you take it off the stove.

Results: Very good. Cabbage had a crunch to it but didn’t dominate. Gives you one of your recommended threetofive helpings of veg for the day.

Rating: *****

Cornmeal Oats

August 7, 2014

I’m not a big fan of cornbread. I mean, I don’t dislike it — kirai janai — and I’ll eat it when served, but I never suggest it, except to go with specific dishes. Some bean dishes, for example. One problem is, it’s too crumbly. It’s either hot and moist and crumbly right out of the oven, or it’s cold and dry and crumbly after sitting about for an hour or so. If it’s not piping hot, the butter sticks to the knife on one side, and pulls up crumbles on the other. And so forth.

MJ made a bunch of cornbread for some sort of church potluck, presumably involving beans. There was lots left over, cold and crumbly, the next morning, and why not?

Experiment 1: This was a test of cornbread as an extender. Since I was loading it up with corn-starchiness I left off the potatoes.

Setup: 1/3 cup of stone ground rolled oats, 1/4 cup (loose pack) of cornbread crumbs, one cup of broth (whatever’s on hand – – I used chicken), salt.  Cook for 10 minutes or so, depending on the exact style of oats.

Results: More like corn-meal mush with an oat extender. Totally overwhelmed the oats. Would probably be better with bacon crumbles. I gave it two stars, but you might like it.

Rating: *****

Experiment 2: This was a test of cornbread as an ingredient. Once again, I left off the potatoes.

Setup: 1/3 cup of stone ground rolled oats, rounded measuring tablespoon of cornbread crumbs, one cup of broth (whatever’s on hand – – I used chicken), salt.  Cook for 10 minutes or so, depending on the exact style of oats.

Results: Strong cornbread flavor. Would still be better with bacon crumbles.

Rating: *****

Oatmeal Dregs

April 24, 2014

Last week we talked about Broth Dregs as an oatmeal extender. But maybe you’re looking for something more conventional? Maybe sweeter? What about Trail Dregs?

I make my own trail mix. Alton Brown has a trail mix recipe that includes dried fruit, nuts, and granola, and of course, Alton Brown’s granola is nothing but oats, another kind of nuts, and shredded coconut. Mine is something like that, minus the oats and the cooking. I use roughly equal parts dried fruit chunks (cherries, raisins, blueberries), roasted almonds, and dried banana slices, plus one of those super-expensive metallic packets of roasted coconut flakes called Dang, and small amounts of chocolate chips. I’m currently on a coconut binge, and MJ picks up bags of Philippine coconut chunks from CostCo. The big chunks go in me, and the flakier chunks go in the trail mix.

After I’ve finished off a butter tubsworth of the mix, there’s about a quarter cup or so of the dust and small flakelets and things at the bottom, much like the broken bits and dust you find at the bottom of a bag of potato chips (!….hold that thought!). Just the right amount to extend an oatmeal breakfast. Of course, you wouldn’t use broth in something like this, but milk would work, or maybe some half and half and half — that’s half half and half, and half water. No potatoes.

Setup: 1/3 cup of stone ground rolled oats, a quarter cup of trail mix remnants (take out any whole almonds you find in it, otherwise people will think you’re weird), one half cup of half and half and one half cup of water, salt (yes, it needs salt — it’s oatmeal). Heat the milk to the steaming point and dump in the dregs and the oatmeal. Cook for 10 minutes or so, depending on the exact style of oats. Stir often.

Results: Delicious! The milk and the coconut work well together, and the other bits add little explosions of flavor which are quite good, but hard to clean off the wall.

Rating: *****

Oatmeal Dregs

April 17, 2014

Today’s oatmeal extender is Dregs. Not the North African tribe, but things at the bottom of things that you’d normally throw away that could be used to add a little non-oatmeal bulk to your oatmeal.

First off is Broth Dregs. Those are the vegetables you cooked in with the beef and bones to make broth, the ones that come out all mushy, and flat tasting. Fear not. The flattest-tasting dregs are still less bland than oatmeal.

Now, when MJ makes broth in our pressure cooker, she normally throws in a couple each of chunked-up carrots, onions, and celery stalks, plus various herbs and spices. These cook down nicely, and end up as a grey goo with chunks of orange. Probably a cup or so. After they’ve cooled down, I chop them up with a big ol’ chopping knife and put them in the fridge. Next morning, I’ll take a couple of fat dinner soupspoons worth — scant quarter-cup, maybe scant(-) — mash it with a fork, and drop it into the broth. You could also just beat it to death with a stir-stick.*

Setup: 1/3 cup of stone ground rolled oats, two dinner teaspoons of potato flakes, one cup of broth, not-quite-a-quarter-cup of mashed up dregs, salt.  Cook for 10 minutes or so, depending on the exact style of oats.  Add the dregs at the beginning and the potato when you take it off the stove..

Results: Delicious! The onion is the most notable flavorant, but the carrot and celery are detectable. If you were making a dinner that involved brothy-stuff, this would be an excellent savoury side dish.

Rating: *****

Next week, maybe something sweeter.

*OK, I tried the stir stick. It works. Wear eye protection. Be prepared to spend the morning unwinding celery threads from the blades