Posts Tagged ‘peas’

Green Thumb Up My Nose

June 23, 2019

Garden Report for 190624

Weather continues its roller-coaster ride. Hot at the beginning of the period, and now forecasting highs in the middle 70s with lows around 50. Typical NENW springtime. We’ve been known to have frost in early July.

Nothing of import happened last week, but this week was Litha and the Midsummer festivities. Here’s what the gardens look like right now. The tomatoes are doing well all over, as are the weeds ground cover plants. Click to embiggen.

Things continued to grow. This week we got our first pea harvest and planted a new batch. Due out the end of August. The Bok Choy in Section 3 has finally raised its head above the …surroundings.

The lettuce in the hanging planter is doing well. The tomato plant is big enough I moved the underchard over to the south railing. Planted a container of radishes for MJ, and another container of lettuce.

Green Thumb Up My Nose

July 26, 2016

Garden Report for 160725

The weather this week was clear and sunny, just brushing 90F at midweek.

This is turning out to be a very odd year. I harvested all the peas, because powdery mildew was attacking them, and because they were old enough that they were wondering if they should switch to being planters instead of eaters. I harvested all the cabbage, because they were pretty well mature (over 90 days since transplanting) and because it was getting hot enough that they’d soon be thinking of bolting. The result is that two of the four KHG sections are now essentially empty, and the other two are only half full (of squash and tomatoes). I had cut back on plantings because of all the trips I’ll be on, but closing out half the garden in mid-July is ridiculous.

Meanwhile, the KHG tomatoes continue to meander on, with few fruit and nothing ripe. The Big Boy in the pot out front (not much soil but lots of sun) finally produced two (almost ripe), and might produce two more.

Week
Ending
7/25
Vegetable Count Weight
g
Unit
Weight
g
Total Total
Weight
kg

tomato 20 0.418
cabbage 3 2750 917 4 4.02
peas 1300 1.675
summer
squash
zucchini
Running Total 6.113

 

Week
Ending
7/18
Vegetable Count Weight
g
Unit
Weight
g
Total Total
Weight
kg

tomato 20 0.418
cabbage  2  1.270
peas  270  –  0.645
summer
squash
     1  120  120    1  0.120
zucchini    2   0.700
Running Total 3.16

Green Thumb Up My Nose

July 17, 2016

Garden Report for 160718

The weather this week started cool and wet, and ended warm and thundry, with highs in the low 80’s.

Peas are ripening well, and it’s going to be a stretch to keep up with them, particularly since they seem to be having some sort of powdery mildew problem. Harvested another cabbage and made a nice soup with it and the leftover cabbage water from last week. So far, the only tomatoes that are producing are the Stupice’s, and we get a couple of sub-ping-pong-ball-sized ones every few days. The summer squash is languishing, just like the tomatoes, but I found two nice sized Zucchini, hidden away.

Week
Ending
7/18
Vegetable Count Weight
g
Unit
Weight
g
Total Total
Weight
kg

tomato  14  268  19 20 0.418
cabbage  1 650  650  2 1.27
peas  –  270  –  0.645
summer
squash
     1  120  120    1  0.120
zucchini  2  700  350  2  0.700
Running Total 3.16

 

Week
Ending
7/11
Vegetable Count Weight
g
Unit
Weight
g
Total Total
Weight
kg

 tomato 6 150 25 6 0.150
 cabbage  1 625   625 1 0.625
 peas  –  375  –  –  0.375
 summer
squash
 zucchini
Running Total  1.15

Green Thumb Up My Nose

April 10, 2016

Garden Report for 160411

Cool, followed by warm, followed by stinking hot. Outdoor thermometer (12ft up the North side of the house) said 80F. Thermometer in the Little White House said 100F+. Next week will show a return to normal, with highs in the mid-50’s and lows in the mid 30’s, with some rain.

Just the thing to keep your seedlings warm

Just the thing to keep your seedlings warm

Perfect weather for putting in new seedlings, except that last week’s cabbages may have been stunted by the heat. I put up the Second White House and installed all the peas I’d been seedlingizing. Then I laid down a batch of the wire shelving and direct seeded more peas, and some Asian long beans. To fill in the gaps, I sprinkled some of last year’s lettuce seeds around.

That filled out Section 2. I’ve got half of Section 1 to deal with yet. That’s scheduled for brassicae, but I’m not sure what kind or where. More wire shelving.

Green Thumb Up My Nose

April 4, 2016

Garden Report for 160404

Cold start to the week followed by warming into the upper 60’s. Forecast is for a …. cold start to the week followed by warming into the lower 70’s.

For the last couple of years I’ve been filling my containers with potting soil at the start of the season, then dumping the soil in a corner of the yard to lie fallow before being used on top of the KHG. So this week I’ve been moving barrows of soil from the corner to the KHG. Enough to add three inches or so to two sections. I figure between that and my four-section crop rotation I should be able to keep my soil pest free.

It hasn’t been the coldest of winters — thanks El Nino — but we did have two weeks with the highs below freezing at the end of December. I measured the soil temperature 12″ down in the garden at the start of every month, and it never dropped below 40F. So I guess I’ve got some good microbiome stuff going on down there.

Started a bunch of cabbages and peas indoors. Will move them outside Real Soon Now. Bought six cabbage seedlings and planted them out under my new mini-greenhouse. We’ll see if we can get a crop before everything bolts.

Not really a cloche

The Little GreenHouse (yes I know it’s white).

UPDATE: We had a nice windstorm today, gusts in the 30’s. But my weighting and clamping seems to have worked, and the LGH is still there

Green Thumb Up My Nose

July 15, 2013

Garden Report for 130715

The weather this week was hot and dry, then cool and windy, then just cool — cool for July anyway.

As Terry Pratchett said “Remember – that which does not kill us can only make us stronger. And that which does kill us leaves us dead.” This week I learned another important lesson: RTFM!

Back in the cold depths of winter, I planned my garden times using the guidance of a website down in Walla^2. When talking about the difficulties of growing brassicae in the NENW, they said things like “growth slows above 68 degrees, and stops, possibly with damage, at 85 degrees“, and

planting out in mid-March for an anticipated harvest around the start of June is the best we can figure. It’s a little cool in middle March, so we need to provide as much help as we can–Walls o’ Water or water-filled plastic jugs among the seedlings; but in late May it’s only–as always, on average–about 73 at the daily high, so even if they’re a little slow, we should be OK. And a March 15th transplant date means a February 1st indoors sowing date.”

So I did. Except that black thumb disease struck all my seedlings this year, and nothing worked. Come late April (six weeks past the plant date), I happened upon a bunch of brassicae bedding plants– cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cabbage — at the local hardware store, and promptly forgot everything I’d read. That’s what I planted in section 1 of the KHG, and that’s what bolted all to hell this week. I showed the broccoli and bok choy last week. Here’s the cauliflower and Brussels sprouts: (more…)

Green Thumb Up My Nose

May 12, 2013

Garden Report for 130513

The weather this week was hot and dry. Highs in the mid to upper 80’s (coming within a biscuit-toss of 90F on Saturday). Forecast is for cloudy/60s/showery for the coming week.

The garden as she looks today

The garden as she looks today

The garden is pretty well set for the summer. Here’s what it looks like right now. Foreground is Section 1, which is all brassicae, except for I’ve direct seeded corn and some peas. Section 2 is chard and lettuces — most of which haven’t come up yet. I also planted some beets there, on Sunday, and I’ll be planting corn seedlings there, as soon as I have any). Beyond the watering can is Section 3, tomatoes and squash, then Section 4, blueberries, strawberries, asparagus. Section 4 has chickenwire over it. The chickenwire and plastic frost covers are hanging on the fence at the far end.

Planted one of the Husky Gold cherry tomatoes into a hanging basket. Was going to plant a Hillbilly in the other one, until I looked it up and found the fruit ranged to a pound or more. The hardware store got a new shipment of squash in, so I have two yellow squash and two acorn squash planted in Section 3 of the KHG. I thought I was picking up zucchini, but I grabbed two pumpkins, instead. I put one in the ground next the Unkillable Rhubarb, and one in a pot under the sakura.

MJ was out on a shopping sweep of the Airway Heights area, and came back with a bunch of peas in a pot, plus an S-100 cherry tomato for my other hanging basket, a Celebrity (Beefsteak size, determinate), and a strawberry hanging planter. Put the S-100 in the hanger, the Celebrity in a pot, and started on the strawberries. The box had a cheap green plastic bag with holes, and a bag of dirt. Inside the dirt was a rubberbanded clump of strawberry roots. Instructions were to fill the bag with dirt, plant the strawberries with the roots buried and the heads showing, lay it on its side, and keep it wet for two weeks. The heads were small and kept breaking off. The dirt didn’t begin to fill the bag. We shall see.

Meanwhile, the hops are pretty much unchanged. One has grown a couple inches. One may have grown. One hasn’t grown and is having trouble hanging to the stake. Two are an inch tall and look healthy. Two have fallen over and look brown at the dirtline. I covered those two over, hoping they’d put down new roots.

My attempts to start my own seeds are having mediocre success. Admittedly, half the seed is last years.

Old seed: 16 corn, 4 sprouted. 20 squash, none sprouted. 10 peas, none sprouted. 7 miniatures (2 squash, watermelon, pumpkin, 2 cucumbers), 2 just sprouted.

New seed: 20 corn, 20 squash, 5 peas. Too soon to tell. Also direct seeded about 20 corn in Section 1. About half of them companion planted with Dow Gauk seed from last year.

Now that the danger of frost is past, I’m having to store those 4x8ft plastic and chickenwire covers. I’ve draped them over the back fence. My neighbor on that side never goes into the yard, except to cut back the weeds every couple of weeks.

I survived the Winter of 2012

I survived the Winter of 2012

Speaking of frost, last winter we had highs below freezing for much of December and January, and in mid-January we had a week where the lows averaged about 10F. Fortunately, we had a heavy snow-pack as well, and a surprising amount of chard survived the winter and are now ready for eating.

Green Thumb Up My Nose

October 28, 2012

Garden Report for 121029

The weather this week was frosty when it wasn’t rainy. No actual snow, but the rain was falling very slowly at times. Frost on the windshield in the morning. Good thing I walk to work.

Intermittent cleaning out of the keyhole garden, and filling up of the compost frame. So far, it’s compressed six inches or so every couple of days. Looks like it will hold all of my garden detritus, plus much of the leaf litter. As I get toward the unsealed end I’ve been using a lot of cornstalks for support of the leaves and stuff inside. I briefly tipped it onto its side and added some more ties on the bottom, then was barely able to get it back upright (90lbs empty, remember). Next time I lay it down it will be down until late spring.

Over the weekend I made a start at adding more compost to the KHG. There’s been some settling, and I didn’t mound it high enough on the central baskets to begin with. While most of the garden cuttings have into the frame, there’s a lot of detritus that should just rot in place.

Harvested the beets on Friday. Not sure what it means when you have more biomass in greens than you do in your crop. Half a dozen thumb-size to big-thumb-size actual beets, along with lots of inedible rootlets. They were in Section 3, and I may have started them too late. Roasted the beets (it smelled like we were cooking dirt), and ate them unpeeled. About a third of the greens went into the fry pan with some stewmeat and the remaining tomato salsa. A very peasant meal. For dessert, we ate our lone mini-canteloupe. Not bad. Almost too ripe. Not sure the result was worth the deck space.

We have about a pound of greens left. Might try mixing them with chard in a gratin, or is it a granita? Speaking of which, the chard still looks good, despite light frosts every night. The peas were probably shaded too much by the corn, and aren’t doing anything. Not dead, just unenthusiastic, like a worker who is training his overseas replacement.

Meanwhile, indoors, another four pounds of tomatoes have ripened. I figure we have about 48 hours to eat them before the next tranche comes along. Speaking of which, I tried some leftover tomato salsa in oatmeal (an upcoming Oataku Chronicles post), but I think I put it in too early — it cooked down too much. Next time, I’ll add it right before the potatoes.

Green Thumb Up My Nose

September 10, 2012

Garden Report for 120910

The weather was warm but not hot all week, brushing up against 90F over the weekend, with some clouds Satuday night that helped the night stay warm, which helped the tomatoes. Big wind scheduled for this week — started kicking up Sunday afternoon. I watered heavily this morning to counter the drying effects.

The scattering of chard I put into Section 3 is finally big enough to use, but it’s bepestered of leaf miners. I did a rough triage Saturday morning. Bad leaves to the compost, damaged leaves for trimming and salad, and big leaves to the salad. Corn isn’t growing fast enough to be ready before first frost, but the peas next to each stalk are getting big enough to start using them for support. My countercritter ops seem to be working, and I haven’t lost any more stalks.

On the squash front, there’s one more buttercup squash ready to harvest, and two or three smallish ones that I hope will develop. The delicata squash are finally starting to produce — three small (one inch) fruits. The summer squash are cranking along, producing one dinner-size squash every other day. Harvested one spaghetti squash, another is ready to harvest, two are getting there, and six or so more are in various stages of growth. The harvested one is a varietal I’m not familiar with, producing mild, slightly greenish strands. Went well with curried chicken on a bed of chard.

Outside of the KHG, the bush cucumber produced two fruit, at about a pound apiece. That’s as much cucumber as we can use all autumn. The bush melon has one three-incher. Cut all of the rhubarb stalks I could find. The tomatoes are encroaching there as well. I’ll give some away, and MJ is making various ‘lades, ‘nades, and elixers with the rest.

We ate our tomato harvest from last week. MJ had half a tomato, and I had the other half. Three of the container tomatoe plants are showing pink in various places, and I harvested two that I’m going to let finish off in the house. I thought there was nothing but green in the KHG, but on Sunday I found a 6oz and a 2oz that were almost ripe, buried in the jungle. The tomatoes seem to be winning the fight against the squash.

Green Thumb Up My Nose

August 27, 2012

Garden Report for 120827

And just like that, Summer is over. We were in the mid-90’s in mid-August. On Tuesday, a cold front blew through, with some rain and minor thunderstorms. After that we were in the mid to upper 70’s, with lows in the 40’s. Sunday touched 85, but the forecast is for continued cooling.

Harvested the last of the beans in the KHG. Got less than a pound, so the total take from the 3×3 patch was just under two pounds. Don’t know if that’s good or not. I could have left them go longer, to see if some of the small ones would bulk up, but lots of leaves were turning yellow, others had holes in them, and something was eating the ends off the baby beans. Time to tear them out.

The spaghetti squash is going great guns. Looks like there will be eight or ten. Nothing new on the crown squash, and I haven’t seen any eight-balls. Summer prolific is still prolificizing. Looks like there’s one delicata.

Some of the tomato plants are six fee tall. Lots of tomatoes, but only the cherry tomatoes, mostly S-100’s, are ripening. None of the tomatoes are very big. The biggest are plum-sized, on a plant meant to produce “up to” one pounders. I guess that’s like my ISP’s “up to” speeds.

Corn isn’t growing much, and that experiment may be a failure (I started way too late). Most of it is a foot to 18″ tall. The t-storms made them slant, but didn’t knock them down. I planted about twenty peas early in the week. One pea next to each cornstalk. I figure it was a cheap climbing post. Peas are cold-hardy, so they should be OK by harvest time in late October. Carrots at the north end of Section 4 are doing well.

The one bush tomato that I’m growing indoors has put out some flowers, so we’ll see. This is a test. If we get decent tomatoes, I’ll try putting up a small greenhouse in the basement, next to the gas heater, with lots of grow lamps and see if we can grow something over the winter.

Green Thumb Up My Nose

August 5, 2012

Garden Report for 120806

Last Wednesday’s full moon, or maybe the new moon on the 17th (we’re not sure), marks the start of Anglo-Saxon Weodmonað, or Weed Month. They certainly knew what they were talking about. Now that the garden is in and growing, I can devote time to cutting back the jungle out there.

GARDEN STATUS

Section 1: Speaking of jungle, the squash is taking over the world. It’s spilled off the east side and is trying to climb the fence. One strand of 8-ball squash has run ten feet along the fence to the south. On the south side, a silent battle is being fought between the squash and the tomatoes, while the Unkillable Rhubarb watches.

Rhubarb-Tomato Jungle
With Squash (all pix click to enlarge)

On the north end of the southern section, the asparagus is fighting to keep its head above….squash. (more…)

Green Thumb Up My Nose

June 18, 2012

Garden Report for 120618

We are finally starting to get decent weather. Still cloudy and cool, but with some sun.

Trying an experiment with the cinderblock holes in the KHG. I have probably 9 or 10 spare tomato seedlings, including some Sweet 100 cherry tomatoes. So I stuck two of them in the holes. If they don’t do well, well, c’est l’guerre.

This weekend started work on Section 2 of the KHG. Right now, it still has some peas, but they aren’t coming along fast enough to be worth keeping. Peapod salad, Wednesday! First step was to start putting up the cinderblock. I have one side done. Second side happens today. Endplate goes on Wednesday.

Meanwhile, I have an idea that I think will work for filling it up. I have lots of uncrushed boxes. I have lots of uncut weeds — as in, knee high:

A year ago I cut the weeds by the birdbath down to the dirt, and planted oregano.
It appears that the weeds have come back

So I’ve started cutting the weeds and filling the boxes with them and leaving them out for the rain that’s cast for midweek. Also cutting up an old feral rosebush that I pulled up last year. That adds more brown.

Brown box of green and brown

As I load the garden I plan to run the sprinkler on everything. The remaining brown will be crumpled newspaper and shredded letters. Last time my problem was getting enough green. This time it will be getting enough brown. All the liquor store boxes have been snapped up by moving students. A small barrel of composting kitchen compost adds more green, as will three weeks of barista coffee grounds. A bin of charcoal dust that I’ve been collecting for the last couple of years will add more brown. I use real wood chunk charcoal, none of that chemical pressed briquette stuff.

Otherwise, things grow. Put some cornmeal around the smaller seedlings to keep off sowbugs. Picked up a packet of “compact plants” that I’m going to try on the deck — cantaloupe, watermelon, summer squash, cucumbers. We’ll see.

Green Thumb Up My Nose

June 11, 2012

Garden Report for 120611

This whole week has felt like it was March. We had highs in the 40s, and winds in the 20s, and rain pretty much all the time. No pouring, just too much to work in the garden in the wind and the cold. Sunday was clear and cold and breezy, like early October. Too bad I didn’t put in pumpkins.

The plants are all doing OK. Too cold to expect greatness. One of the peas died, and one of the long beans in the KHG was stripped by something, that left the other two alone. The asparagus is showing three or four foot-high pencil-thin stalks already.

I bought some peppers (yellow banana) and a dill plant at the local hardware store’s Dump Our Old Plants Sale. They all survived the transplant into the KHG. I was worried about the rain eroding my KHG volcano, but it seems to have held up well. Time to take another picture, but I’ll have to weed first. Probably won’t happen until sometime next week, ’cause we are into Finals and such.

Over in the graveyard of the hops, I have some of the replacement flowers just starting to show.

I am ready to close down the seed sprouting setup. Maybe one more increment to get things ready for the Section 2 KHG, which will be the last Friday in June, just over two weeks away. I am thinking I can build a new section each end-of-month compost sale, and have all four complete by autumn. Maybe then plant something nitrogen-fixated and let it grow as long into the winter as it can.

Green Thumb Up My Nose

May 21, 2012

Garden Report for 120521

The weather was nice most of the week, cooling slightly towards the end.  This week is forecast cool and rainy — like a nice April week should be. Too bad it’s the end of May. Surprisingly, it looks like it’s actually been warmer than usual. I did a visual scan of the weather curves at WeatherSpark, and it looks like over the past two months we’ve been well above average 30% of the time, and our minima have rarely been below the average. My calendar for yesterday said it was ‘early outdoor planting’ day, for things like tomatoes.

Slowly, one or two things are sprouting from the 11 May planting in the seed sprouter — Better Boy tomatoes, lemon cucumber.

Outdoors, I did a second planting of lettuce and radishes, plus, I planted a small urn-shaped flowerpot with chives. Still waiting for the peas to produce. Still waiting for the hops to sprout. It’s been officially one month now, but we’ve had only about a week of warmth.

Both the hanging tomatoes are doing OK, probably not quite as well as the others, but they have less soil and no warmth. The real reason for planting them is decorativeness, and because I can use corners of the deck that I would not otherwise put stuff in.

The keyhole garden in Section 1 of the main garden is doing OK. By that I mean that nothing has died, but nothing has sprouted, either. In Section 2, the peas are only about 18″ high. I also planted some grass seed there. That all gets plowed under, come mid-June. Section 3 is spinach (barely visible), and transplanted head lettuce. I took off the covering from the lettuce.

Still have two large pottery pots to plant, plus about five other pots of various shapes. Plus the other two sections of the main garden. I have an embarrassment of coffee grounds right now. I haven’t used all that I got ten days ago, let alone the latest delivery. I’d like to put it in the fridge for the next three weeks, but MJ has the usual unreasonable housewifely objections. I guess I’ll dig it into the new plantings. LATER: I snuck the bag into the tiny downstairs bar fridge. I had a bit of a hangnail, and the bag tore. Kids, remember: good grooming is important.

If this all comes in on time, we’ll have real cornucopia on our hands. Starting in mid-August we’ll probably be able to feed ourselves solely from the gardens. Assuming one wants to live on salads and greens and squash, oh my.

Green Thumb Up My Nose

November 21, 2011

Garden Report for 111121

Looks like this will be the final report of the year.

Moved the last of the tomatoes out of the ripening boxen in the living room. About twenty of them, all in the cherry-to-smaller-than-golfball size. Total green tomatoes brought in for ripening was >60, and they pretty much all worked out. The Mr Stripey’s tended to dry and shrivel at the orange stage, so they looked like pumpkins for munchkins. We didn’t have any rot before ripening. If anything, the problem was that they all ripened at once. I am now convinced that warmth is the most important parameter.

I pulled up the artichoke. It produced two fruits, and we bought more at the farmer’s market, but we decided it was just too much work to get anything edible out of them.

This week we had a couple of 20F frosts, which pretty well did for the peas. So on Friday I spread the dirt from the tomato planters across the garden, and dug everything in. Of course, since only the top inch or so had thawed, it wasn’t much of a dig. Still, it got the dirt spread out and the plants mulched under. Then, this weekend, it snowed about 4″ worth, so I’m glad I did it.

Over Christmas I plan to sit down and think about what I want for next year. As I read somewhere, the reason for a home garden (other than getting dirt under your fingernails — a most overrated hobby) are to get vegetables that are 1. fresh (for peas, that’s important; for potatoes, not so much), 2. otherwise unobtainable (vampire squash vs plain old acorn), or 3. too expensive (I can’t think of an example that isn’t in (1) or (2) or that I can’t grow in the NENW anyhow). And, of course, I need to keep in mind that 197 day growing season.

Green Thumb Up My Nose

November 14, 2011

Garden Report for 111114

I should have issued this on Pocky Day: 111111

The gardening continues to wind down. Friday, I cut down all the dead plants, raked up all the leaves, carted it all to the big recycling dumpsters. Lots of people there with me, because we had the first snow of the season scheduled for Friday night. Since we had winds forecast to be gusting to 50, I did some extra shoring up of the plastic greenhouse.

I also moved all the tomato containers over to the garden, and dumped them at various spots. The plan is, the root-bound piles will erode back into the soil, and I’ll mix them with the mulch from the potato cans and a couple of cans from the recycling center when it opens in the spring, and give myself another inch of topsoil-like substance. It’s best to get this done as early as possible, because they get heavy when rained on and hard to work with when frozen. Since I haven’t totally given up on the peas, I can’t dig everything in just yet. Clearing the containers from the south side of the house let me move the two azelia pots over there. I’ll mulch them up and see if they can survive a winter outside.

The wind and snow came right on schedule. Half of the town was out of power, but the other two houses were OK. The greenhouse survived just fine. I calculated the time between snows from our last snow of the season at the end of April — 197 days. So Spring, Summer, and Fall had to fit into half a year this year, while Winter had the other six months to itself. I miss Portland. Hell, I miss Santa Maria.

Green Thumb Up My Nose

October 31, 2011

Garden Report for 111031

Harvested the last of the potatoes today. As I said, they are a cage variety (Viking Mauves or something), and, as I feared, they didn’t do well. They were in a regulation-size plastic garbage can. Dug down eighteen inches, and found only peanuts (we’re talking serious counter-squirrel-ops this winter). Found the first potato when I was armpit down — about the size of a cherry tomato. Found the second one a few inches lower. Double golfball size, and kindof…asteroid-shaped. Not one of the big ones, with the gravitational slumping thing, one of the small, barely accreted ones. The rest came when I was three-quarters of the way in, very nearly waist-deep.

Total yield. Well, …erm…one kilogram. Yep. 2.2lbs of rough-skinned, dark blue starch. Two worth peeling, six you need to peel but don’t want to (ya ever tried peeling an asteroid?), and the rest are cherry-sized. We’ll boil-n-mash some tonight. Maybe save some for oatmeal.

The peas, meanwhile, have apparently not been killed by the frosts, and are probably growing. They only have three weeks to get to the advertised date for harvest.

LATER: Tried the potatoes. Peeled, boiled, stir-sticked into creaminess. Used some vinegar in the water to hold the color. It did. When we poured the vinegar off, it held on to the color and took it with it. Color on the plate was an unappetizing grey-blue. Maybe Light Slate. Flavor, was only so-so. Next time, I think we’ll steam them. Of course, the problem with potatoes is that half a cup of mashed makes me gain a pound and a half.

Green Thumb Up My Nose

October 17, 2011

Garden Report for 111017

So, the temperature was scheduled to hit 34 on Saturday night, it hasn’t been above 65 this week, and it won’t be above 60 next week, and I decided it’s time to bring in the remaining tomatoes. Total haul was just over 12lbs, which makes the grand total somewhere around 25 or 30lb, I think. A friend said I should wrap them in something called news paper, but I checked at the hardware store and they didn’t have any. I have some old boxen with mulched-cardboard inserts that were used to ship wine bottles (laying down style, not the standing up stuff). I think I’ll use them.

The peas are still coming along. We’ll see if they can beat the hard frosts of November. There’s still another can of potatoes to be opened, but I am going to wait at least a week on them.

Sunday, I planned to rip up all the tomato plants, and the dead cornstalks and take them over to the mulching place, along with the remains of the Killer Rosebush what was lurking in the shadows between the fence and the ornamental weeds, as well as the trimmings from all the hawthorn and cedar and not-readily-identifiable trees that want to dump throwberries and leaves and bark and so forth into my gutters. That may or may not work out, but hey, Tuesday’s another day.